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Текущая версия: Dan ,

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Kernel panics are always tough to nail down as they can be either bad memory or a HD that is flaky. With that said I can tell you we have quite a few systems running with 16 GB of RAM so I don't see that in its self as the issue. You could have a bad module socket as well here.
 
I would start off making sure the modules are a matched pair if they are and you got them form a good supplier then I would look deeper here. What happens when you pull one module is the system stable then? Try moving this module to the other slot andany difference? Then try the other module (don't mix them up). Once you have proven the modules are both good and the slots are not the issue. Then you need to look at the HD.
I would start off making sure the modules are a matched pair if they are and you got them form a good supplier then I would look deeper here. What happens when you pull one module is the system stable then? Try moving this module to the other slot andany difference? Then try the other module (don't mix them up). Once you have proven the modules are both good and the slots are not the issue. Then you need to look at the HD.
 
First make sure you have a good backup, then setup a boot up disk, you can setup a USB thumb drive or a FireWire or USB HD. Once you have it prep'ed go into Startup disk control panel and select your external drive as the boot up disk. Then open up Apples '''Disk Utility''' from the external disk copy. First run permission repair then run disk repair and then run permission repair once again (in that order). Did you encounter any errors and did the second pass of permission repair encounter any errors? If you did you may need to delete the partition and re-do things. But before you do that yet, switch back to your internal drive and see if things are stable. If it is leave things alone. Just keep an eye on things.

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Оригинальный сообщение: Dan ,

Текст:

Kernel panics are always tough to nail down as they can be either bad memory or a HD that is flaky. With that said I can tell you we have quite a few systems running with 16 GB of RAM so I don't see that in its self as the issue. You could have a bad module socket as well here.

I would start off making sure the modules are a matched pair if they are and you got them form a good supplier then I would look deeper here. What happens when you pull one module is the system stable then? Try moving this module to the other slot and difference? Then try the other module (don't mix them up). Once you have proven the modules are both good and the slots are not the issue. Then you need to look at the HD.

First make sure you have a good backup, then setup a boot up disk, you can setup a USB thumb drive or a FireWire or USB HD. Once you have it prep'ed go into Startup disk control panel and select your external drive as the boot up disk. Then open up Apples '''Disk Utility''' from the external disk copy. First run permission repair then run disk repair and then run permission repair once again (in that order). Did you encounter any errors and did the second pass of permission repair encounter any errors? If you did you may need to delete the partition and re-do things. But before you do that yet, switch back to your internal drive and see if things are stable. If it is leave things alone. Just keep an eye on things.

Статус:

open