Перейти к основному содержанию
Помощь

Текущая версия: Nick ,

Текст:

-The Core 2 Duo series is obsolete for CPU and GPU intensive work, but not general usage. If you’re just doing basic tasks, you are better off keeping it for a few more years until it is truly obsolete or breaks. Since you have two, you’re set on parts for a while. If you upgrade the [guide|1762|memory] and [guide|1766|hard drive], you will be set for a few years. If you can afford it, 512GB SSD’s are becoming affordable enough they are no longer out of reach in terms of cost.
+The Core 2 Duo series is obsolete for CPU and GPU intensive work, but not general usage. That said, these are still useful for basic tasks everyone does despite being so old. You are better off keeping it for a few more years until it is truly obsolete or breaks. Upgrade the [guide|1762|memory] and [guide|1766|hard drive] as well so you can further extend their remaining life. If you can afford it, 512GB SSD’s are becoming affordable enough they are no longer out of reach in terms of cost.
-As far as an operating system goes, the problem with 10.6 is it began to lose application support when 10.8 came out (and made worse with 10.9), so the situation will be even worse today then it was for me as a 5 year holdout. You’ll need to upgrade to a newer operating system for modern application support as well. It’s really up to you how high you go, but you want to use something with modern application support.
+As far as an operating system goes, the problem with 10.6 is it began to lose application support when 10.8 came out (and made worse with 10.9), so the situation will be even worse today then it was for me as a 5 year holdout and you will require a more modern release of OS X. It’s really up to you how high you go, but you want to use something with modern application support.
-The only downside to having an “obsolete” system is Apple will not service it. However, this is also a partially moot point because the price Apple quotes for repair tends to exceed the value of a used machine with similar specs. The upside here is yours is old enough it doesn’t suffer from the upgrade problems all of the modern Macs do. Even though it’s older (and will struggle in some use cases), it’s a far better machine in the aspect of upgradeability when you compare it to the modern ones.
+The only downside to having an “obsolete” system is Apple will not service it. However, this is also a partially moot point because the price Apple quotes for repair tends to exceed the value of a used machine with similar specs. While you are on your own for repairs, these iMacs do not suffer from the upgrade problems all of the modern ones do. Even though it’s older (and will struggle in some use cases), it’s easily upgraded and you can easily work on it in terms of replacing most of the components.
I was able to get 5 years out of my T9550 MBP 17” Unibody (Early 2009) before it began to show it’s age and failed beyond economical repair. I kept it so long because that was the second to last 17” ever released - granted the 2011 17” exists but it’s got irreparable GPU issues. You’re stuck with the 2010 if you want a Core i series 17” these days and those are beginning to show their age as well.

Статус:

open

Отредактировано: Nick ,

Текст:

The Core 2 Duo series is obsolete for CPU and GPU intensive work, but not general usage. If you’re just doing basic tasks, you are better off keeping it for a few more years until it is truly obsolete or breaks. Since you have two, you’re set on parts for a while. If you upgrade the [guide|1762|memory] and [guide|1766|hard drive], you will be set for a few years. If you can afford it, 512GB SSD’s are becoming affordable enough they are no longer out of reach in terms of cost.
-As far as an operating system goes, the problem with 10.6 is it began to lose application support when 10.8 came out, so the situation will be even worse today. You’ll need to upgrade to a newer operating system for modern application support as well. It’s really up to you how high you go, but you want to use something with modern application support.
+As far as an operating system goes, the problem with 10.6 is it began to lose application support when 10.8 came out (and made worse with 10.9), so the situation will be even worse today then it was for me as a 5 year holdout. You’ll need to upgrade to a newer operating system for modern application support as well. It’s really up to you how high you go, but you want to use something with modern application support.
The only downside to having an “obsolete” system is Apple will not service it. However, this is also a partially moot point because the price Apple quotes for repair tends to exceed the value of a used machine with similar specs. The upside here is yours is old enough it doesn’t suffer from the upgrade problems all of the modern Macs do. Even though it’s older (and will struggle in some use cases), it’s a far better machine in the aspect of upgradeability when you compare it to the modern ones.
I was able to get 5 years out of my T9550 MBP 17” Unibody (Early 2009) before it began to show it’s age and failed beyond economical repair. I kept it so long because that was the second to last 17” ever released - granted the 2011 17” exists but it’s got irreparable GPU issues. You’re stuck with the 2010 if you want a Core i series 17” these days and those are beginning to show their age as well.

Статус:

open

Отредактировано: Nick ,

Текст:

The Core 2 Duo series is obsolete for CPU and GPU intensive work, but not general usage. If you’re just doing basic tasks, you are better off keeping it for a few more years until it is truly obsolete or breaks. Since you have two, you’re set on parts for a while. If you upgrade the [guide|1762|memory] and [guide|1766|hard drive], you will be set for a few years. If you can afford it, 512GB SSD’s are becoming affordable enough they are no longer out of reach in terms of cost.
-As far as an operating system goes, the problem with 10.6 is it began to lose application support when 10.8 came out, so the situation will be even worse today. You’ll need to upgrade to a newer operating system for modern application support as well.
+As far as an operating system goes, the problem with 10.6 is it began to lose application support when 10.8 came out, so the situation will be even worse today. You’ll need to upgrade to a newer operating system for modern application support as well. It’s really up to you how high you go, but you want to use something with modern application support.
-The only downside to having an “obsolete” system is Apple will not service it. However, if you can learn to do the repairs yourself this isn’t a big deal since many repairs through Apple tend to exceed the used value of the system. Along with that, you have an older machine, so it doesn’t suffer the upgrade problems the modern Macs all do. Even though it’s older (and will struggle in some use cases), it’s a far better machine in the aspect of upgradeability when you compare it to the modern ones.
+The only downside to having an “obsolete” system is Apple will not service it. However, this is also a partially moot point because the price Apple quotes for repair tends to exceed the value of a used machine with similar specs. The upside here is yours is old enough it doesn’t suffer from the upgrade problems all of the modern Macs do. Even though it’s older (and will struggle in some use cases), it’s a far better machine in the aspect of upgradeability when you compare it to the modern ones.
-I was able to get 5 years out of my T9550 MBP 17” Unibody before it began to show it’s age and failed in such a way repair was uneconomical. It was an old machine, but I kept it until the end because Apple stopped making 17” laptops in 2011 and the 2011 model has GPU issues that cannot be repaired.
+I was able to get 5 years out of my T9550 MBP 17” Unibody (Early 2009) before it began to show it’s age and failed beyond economical repair. I kept it so long because that was the second to last 17” ever released - granted the 2011 17” exists but it’s got irreparable GPU issues. You’re stuck with the 2010 if you want a Core i series 17” these days and those are beginning to show their age as well.

Статус:

open

Отредактировано: Nick ,

Текст:

-The Core 2 Duo series is obsolete for CPU and GPU intensive work, but not general usage. If you’re just doing basic tasks, you are better off keeping it for a few more years until it is truly obsolete or breaks. Since you have two, you’re set on parts for a while. Upgrade the [guide|1762|memory] and [guide|1766|hard drive] and you should be set for a few years. If you can afford it, 512GB SSD’s are becoming affordable enough it isn’t out of reach for many anymore.
+The Core 2 Duo series is obsolete for CPU and GPU intensive work, but not general usage. If you’re just doing basic tasks, you are better off keeping it for a few more years until it is truly obsolete or breaks. Since you have two, you’re set on parts for a while. If you upgrade the [guide|1762|memory] and [guide|1766|hard drive], you will be set for a few years. If you can afford it, 512GB SSD’s are becoming affordable enough they are no longer out of reach in terms of cost.
As far as an operating system goes, the problem with 10.6 is it began to lose application support when 10.8 came out, so the situation will be even worse today. You’ll need to upgrade to a newer operating system for modern application support as well.
The only downside to having an “obsolete” system is Apple will not service it. However, if you can learn to do the repairs yourself this isn’t a big deal since many repairs through Apple tend to exceed the used value of the system. Along with that, you have an older machine, so it doesn’t suffer the upgrade problems the modern Macs all do. Even though it’s older (and will struggle in some use cases), it’s a far better machine in the aspect of upgradeability when you compare it to the modern ones.
I was able to get 5 years out of my T9550 MBP 17” Unibody before it began to show it’s age and failed in such a way repair was uneconomical. It was an old machine, but I kept it until the end because Apple stopped making 17” laptops in 2011 and the 2011 model has GPU issues that cannot be repaired.

Статус:

open

Отредактировано: Nick ,

Текст:

-The Core 2 Duo series is obsolete for CPU and GPU intensive work, but not general usage. If you’re just doing basic tasks, you are better off keeping it for a few more years until it is truly obsolete or breaks. Since you have two, you’re set on parts for a while. Upgrade the [https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/iMac+Intel+21.5-Inch+EMC+2308+RAM+Replacement/1762|memory] and [https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/iMac+Intel+21.5-Inch+EMC+2308+Hard+Drive+Replacement/1766|hard drive] and you should be set for a few years. If you can afford it, 512GB SSD’s are becoming affordable enough it isn’t out of reach for many anymore.
+The Core 2 Duo series is obsolete for CPU and GPU intensive work, but not general usage. If you’re just doing basic tasks, you are better off keeping it for a few more years until it is truly obsolete or breaks. Since you have two, you’re set on parts for a while. Upgrade the [guide|1762|memory] and [guide|1766|hard drive] and you should be set for a few years. If you can afford it, 512GB SSD’s are becoming affordable enough it isn’t out of reach for many anymore.
-The only downside to having an “obsolete” system is Apple will not service it - but more then likely this doesn’t matter since Apple’s repair prices will exceed the street value of the Mac anyway. At this point, most of the Macs I like (and would willingly use) are all obsolete by Apple (or so close they might as well get it over with). I was able to get 5 years out of my T9550 17” Unibody before it began to show it’s age and broke in such a way repair was uneconmical - it held up well over the 5-6 years I used it.
+As far as an operating system goes, the problem with 10.6 is it began to lose application support when 10.8 came out, so the situation will be even worse today. You’ll need to upgrade to a newer operating system for modern application support as well.
+
+The only downside to having an “obsolete” system is Apple will not service it. However, if you can learn to do the repairs yourself this isn’t a big deal since many repairs through Apple tend to exceed the used value of the system. Along with that, you have an older machine, so it doesn’t suffer the upgrade problems the modern Macs all do. Even though it’s older (and will struggle in some use cases), it’s a far better machine in the aspect of upgradeability when you compare it to the modern ones.
+
+I was able to get 5 years out of my T9550 MBP 17” Unibody before it began to show it’s age and failed in such a way repair was uneconomical. It was an old machine, but I kept it until the end because Apple stopped making 17” laptops in 2011 and the 2011 model has GPU issues that cannot be repaired.

Статус:

open

Отредактировано: Nick ,

Текст:

-The Core 2 Duo series is obsolete for CPU and GPU intensive work, but not general usage. If you’re just doing basic tasks, you are better off keeping it for a few more years until it is truly obsolete or breaks. Since you have two, you’re set on parts for a while.
+The Core 2 Duo series is obsolete for CPU and GPU intensive work, but not general usage. If you’re just doing basic tasks, you are better off keeping it for a few more years until it is truly obsolete or breaks. Since you have two, you’re set on parts for a while. Upgrade the [https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/iMac+Intel+21.5-Inch+EMC+2308+RAM+Replacement/1762|memory] and [https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/iMac+Intel+21.5-Inch+EMC+2308+Hard+Drive+Replacement/1766|hard drive] and you should be set for a few years. If you can afford it, 512GB SSD’s are becoming affordable enough it isn’t out of reach for many anymore.
-The only real downside to having it branded as “obsolete” is Apple will no longer service it - but more then likely this doesn’t matter since Apple’s repair prices will exceed the street value of the Mac anyway. At this point, most of the Macs I like (and would willingly use) are all obsolete by Apple (or so close they might as well get it over with). I was able to get 5 years out of my T9550 17” Unibody before it began to show it’s age and broke in such a way repair was uneconmical - it held up well over the 5-6 years I used it.
+The only downside to having an “obsolete” system is Apple will not service it - but more then likely this doesn’t matter since Apple’s repair prices will exceed the street value of the Mac anyway. At this point, most of the Macs I like (and would willingly use) are all obsolete by Apple (or so close they might as well get it over with). I was able to get 5 years out of my T9550 17” Unibody before it began to show it’s age and broke in such a way repair was uneconmical - it held up well over the 5-6 years I used it.

Статус:

open

Отредактировано: Nick ,

Текст:

The Core 2 Duo series is obsolete for CPU and GPU intensive work, but not general usage. If you’re just doing basic tasks, you are better off keeping it for a few more years until it is truly obsolete or breaks. Since you have two, you’re set on parts for a while.
-The only real downside to having it branded as “obsolete” is Apple will no longer service it - but more then likely this doesn’t matter since Apple’s repair prices will exceed the street value of the Mac anyway. At this point, most of the Macs I like (and would willingly use) are all obsolete by Apple (or so close they might as well get it over with).
+The only real downside to having it branded as “obsolete” is Apple will no longer service it - but more then likely this doesn’t matter since Apple’s repair prices will exceed the street value of the Mac anyway. At this point, most of the Macs I like (and would willingly use) are all obsolete by Apple (or so close they might as well get it over with). I was able to get 5 years out of my T9550 17” Unibody before it began to show it’s age and broke in such a way repair was uneconmical - it held up well over the 5-6 years I used it.

Статус:

open

Отредактировано: Nick ,

Текст:

-The Core 2 Duo series is obsolete for CPU intensive work, but not general usage. If you’re just doing basic tasks, you are better off keeping it for a few more years until it is truly obsolete or breaks. Since you have two, you’re set on parts for a while.
+The Core 2 Duo series is obsolete for CPU and GPU intensive work, but not general usage. If you’re just doing basic tasks, you are better off keeping it for a few more years until it is truly obsolete or breaks. Since you have two, you’re set on parts for a while.
The only real downside to having it branded as “obsolete” is Apple will no longer service it - but more then likely this doesn’t matter since Apple’s repair prices will exceed the street value of the Mac anyway. At this point, most of the Macs I like (and would willingly use) are all obsolete by Apple (or so close they might as well get it over with).

Статус:

open

Отредактировано: Nick ,

Текст:

-The Core 2 Duo series is obsolete for CPU intensive work, but not general usage. If you’re just doing basic tasks, you are better off keeping it for a few more years until it is truly obsolete or breaks.
+The Core 2 Duo series is obsolete for CPU intensive work, but not general usage. If you’re just doing basic tasks, you are better off keeping it for a few more years until it is truly obsolete or breaks. Since you have two, you’re set on parts for a while.
The only real downside to having it branded as “obsolete” is Apple will no longer service it - but more then likely this doesn’t matter since Apple’s repair prices will exceed the street value of the Mac anyway. At this point, most of the Macs I like (and would willingly use) are all obsolete by Apple (or so close they might as well get it over with).

Статус:

open

Отредактировано: Nick ,

Текст:

The Core 2 Duo series is obsolete for CPU intensive work, but not general usage. If you’re just doing basic tasks, you are better off keeping it for a few more years until it is truly obsolete or breaks.
-The only real downside to having it branded as “obsolete” is Apple will no longer service it - but more then likely this doesn’t matter since Apple’s repair prices will exceed the street value of the Mac anyway.
+The only real downside to having it branded as “obsolete” is Apple will no longer service it - but more then likely this doesn’t matter since Apple’s repair prices will exceed the street value of the Mac anyway. At this point, most of the Macs I like (and would willingly use) are all obsolete by Apple (or so close they might as well get it over with).

Статус:

open

Оригинальный сообщение: Nick ,

Текст:

The Core 2 Duo series  is obsolete for CPU intensive work, but not general usage. If you’re just doing basic tasks, you are better off keeping it for a few more years until it is truly obsolete or breaks.

The only real downside to having it branded as “obsolete” is Apple will no longer service it - but more then likely this doesn’t matter since Apple’s repair prices will exceed the street value of the Mac anyway.

Статус:

open